EurekAlert! - Breaking News
13 Nov 2016

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

  • CPR training less common among older adults, who may be at highest risk of sudden cardiac arrest
    Sat, 12 Nov 2016 00:00:00 EST
    More than 350,000 Americans suffer from out-of-hospital sudden cardiac arrest each year. But only 32 percent of cardiac arrest victims nationwide receive the lifesaving intervention. New research from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania sheds light on training gaps that could pave the way to boosting the number of people who are prepared to jump into action.
  • CPR from bystanders associated with better outcomes after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in pediatrics
    Sat, 12 Nov 2016 00:00:00 EST
    Receiving cardiopulmonary resuscitation from a bystander -- compared with not -- was associated with better overall and neurologically favorable survival for children and adolescents who had out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, according to an article published online by JAMA Pediatrics. The study is being presented at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2016.
  • Mayo Clinic research sheds light on why some rheumatoid arthritis patients respond poorly to biologics
    Sat, 12 Nov 2016 00:00:00 EST
    A Mayo Clinic study is shedding light on why some rheumatoid arthritis patients respond poorly when treated with tumor necrosis factor inhibitors, part of a class of drugs called biologics.
  • Behavioral intervention reduces anxiety, depression among adults impaired by psychological distress
    Sat, 12 Nov 2016 00:00:00 EST
    In a study published online by JAMA, Atif Rahman, Ph.D., of the University of Liverpool, England, and colleagues evaluated the effectiveness of a multicomponent behavioral intervention delivered in primary care centers in Peshawar, Pakistan by lay health workers to adults with psychological distress. The study is being released to coincide with its presentation at the International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies annual meeting.
  • Allopurinol does not increase chronic kidney disease risk in gout patients
    Sat, 12 Nov 2016 00:00:00 EST
    Allopurinol, a widely used treatment for lowering serum urate levels, does not appear to increase risk of kidney deterioration in gout patients with normal or near-normal kidney function, according to new research findings presented this week at the 2016 ACR/ARHP Annual Meeting in Washington.
  • Men and women show sex-specific improvements after hip replacement
    Sat, 12 Nov 2016 00:00:00 EST
    Outcomes such as pain, function, range of motion, and strength after total hip arthroplasty, or joint replacement surgery, are different for men and women, which could lead to the development of sex-specific rehabilitation programs, according to new research findings presented this week at the 2016 ACR/ARHP Annual Meeting in Washington.
  • Staying on dmards through surgery does not increase post-op infection risk
    Sat, 12 Nov 2016 00:00:00 EST
    Rheumatoid arthritis patients who keep using their disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs prior to surgery do not face an increased risk of infection after their procedures, according to new research findings presented this week at the 2016 ACR/ARHP Annual Meeting in Washington.
  • First-line therapy with rituximab may lower mortality risk in RA patients with lung conditions
    Sat, 12 Nov 2016 00:00:00 EST
    Patients with rheumatoid arthritis who also have lung involvement often have increased mortality, but first-line therapy with rituximab may help them live longer when compared with the use of TNF inhibitors , according to new research findings presented this week at the 2016 ACR/ARHP Annual Meeting in Washington.
  • Myocardial inflammation elevated in RA patients
    Sat, 12 Nov 2016 00:00:00 EST
    Two new studies measure the prevalence of myocardial inflammation in RA patients without known cardiovascular disease, assess how it is associated with high disease activity and show how disease-modifying therapy may decrease this type of inflammation, according to new research findings presented this week at the 2016 ACR/ARHP Annual Meeting in Washington.
  • Three gene sets could predict response to rheumatoid arthritis therapies
    Sat, 12 Nov 2016 00:00:00 EST
    Three gene expression signatures can help rheumatologists predict which patients are more likely to respond to tumor necrosis factor inhibitors (TNFi) or B-cell depletion therapies in patients with moderate to severe rheumatoid arthritis, according to new research findings presented this week at the American College of Rheumatology Annual Scientific Meeting in Washington.
  • Statins may lower mortality risk in ankylosing spondylitis and psoriatic arthritis patients
    Sat, 12 Nov 2016 00:00:00 EST
    Patients with ankylosing spondylitis or psoriatic arthritis who take statins may have as much as a 33 percent lower mortality risk, according to new research findings presented this week at the American College of Rheumatology Annual Scientific Meeting in Washington.
  • Wnt inhibitor may ease pain, and improve function and cartilage loss in knee OA
    Sat, 12 Nov 2016 00:00:00 EST
    Injection of a Wnt inhibitor drug showed promise to ease pain, improve joint function, and even slow or reverse cartilage loss in patients with knee osteoarthritis, according to new research findings presented this week at the 2016 ACR/ARHP Annual Meeting in Washington in Washington.Osteoarthritis, or OA, is the most common joint disease affecting middle-aged and older people.
  • Rheumatology practices differ widely on meeting quality measures for patient care
    Sat, 12 Nov 2016 00:00:00 EST
    Rheumatology practices in the United States aren't always meeting key quality measures for patient care that may affect them as new physician reimbursement laws go into effect in the next year, according to new research findings presented this week at the American College of Rheumatology Annual Scientific Meeting in Washington.
  • Most people with knee OA meet physical function level to walk recommended 6,000 steps a day
    Sat, 12 Nov 2016 00:00:00 EST
    People with knee osteoarthritis (OA) often have difficulty with physical function, such as getting out of a chair and walking, which limits the ability to be physically active. According to new research findings presented this week at the 2016 ACR/ARHP Annual Meeting in Washington, most people with knee OA actually already have the physical function necessary to walk at least 6,000 steps a day, the minimum amount needed to improve their arthritis and prevent disability.
  • Too many patients with inflammatory joint diseases undermanaged for cardiovascular risk
    Sat, 12 Nov 2016 00:00:00 EST
    While patients with inflammatory rheumatic diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis or spondyloarthritis are at increased risk for cardiovascular disease, too few are prescribed preventive medications or meeting target goals to prevent heart-related events, according to new research findings presented this week at the 2016 ACR/ARHP Annual Meeting in Washington.
  • Cardiovascular event risk of RA patients comparable to type-2 diabetes over 15-year period
    Sat, 12 Nov 2016 00:00:00 EST
    Rheumatoid arthritis is associated with serious risk of cardiovascular (CV) disease events such as heart attack or stroke. Over a 15-year period, people with RA may have double the risk of CV events as those in the general population, rates that are similar to people with type-2 diabetes, according to new research findings presented this week at the 2016 ACR/ARHP Annual Meeting in Washington.
  • More coordinated care between physicians may improve lipid screenings in RA patients
    Sat, 12 Nov 2016 00:00:00 EST
    Patients with rheumatoid arthritis whose rheumatologists and primary-care physicians coordinate their care have a higher likelihood of being screened for hyperlipidemia, a key risk factor for coronary heart disease, according to new research findings presented this week at the American College of Rheumatology Annual Scientific Meeting in Washington.
  • Monocyte gene expression signatures predict how ra patients respond to anti-TNF therapy
    Sat, 12 Nov 2016 00:00:00 EST
    Distinct gene expression signatures in rheumatoid arthritis patients could help rheumatologists predict how these individuals will respond to tumor necrosis factor inhibitors, and may one day enable a more personalized approach to RA therapy, according to new research findings presented this week at the 2016 ACR/ARHP Annual Meeting in Washington.
  • Urate-lowering therapy helps chronic kidney disease patients improve organ function
    Sat, 12 Nov 2016 00:00:00 EST
    Chronic kidney disease patients who take urate-lowering therapy and achieve target urate levels show improvement in kidney function, according to new research findings presented this week at the 2016 ACR/ARHP Annual Meeting in Washington.
  • Gut bacteria may be a trigger for antiphospholipid syndrome
    Sat, 12 Nov 2016 00:00:00 EST
    The gut microbiomes of patients with antiphospholipid syndrome show higher levels of phospholipid-producing bacteria, and this findings point to microbes being a trigger for this life-threatening disease, according to new research findings presented this week at the American College of Rheumatology Annual Scientific Meeting in Washington.
  • Combination of NSAIDs and TNF-inhibitors shows benefit for ankylosing spondylitis
    Sat, 12 Nov 2016 00:00:00 EST
    A combination of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and TNF-inhibitors may help slow down spine damage in ankylosing spondylitis, according to new research findings presented this week at the American College of Rheumatology Annual Scientific Meeting in Washington.
  • Race, ethnicity and education levels linked to delays accessing lupus specialty care
    Sat, 12 Nov 2016 00:00:00 EST
    Lupus patients who are African-American or Asian, or those who have attained only a high school education or less, had longer delays in seeing a rheumatologist or nephrologist for a confirmed diagnosis than other groups, according to new research findings presented this week at the 2016 ACR/ARHP Annual Meeting in Washington.
  • Women & long-term axial spondyloarthropathy patients at higher risk for manifestations
    Sat, 12 Nov 2016 00:00:00 EST
    Gender and disease duration can help predict which axial spondyloarthritis patients will develop extra-articular manifestations such as uveitis, or inflammation of the eye, according to new research findings presented this week at the 2016 ACR/ARHP Annual Meeting in Washington.
  • New funding strategies & graduate education needed to fill rheumatology workforce gaps
    Sat, 12 Nov 2016 00:00:00 EST
    The US adult rheumatology workforce is in jeopardy of a serious decline, and incentives to pursue rheumatology training, including help with graduate medical education funding, could provide critical relief, according to new research findings presented this week at the 2016 ACR/ARHP Annual Meeting Washington.
  • TNF inhibitors don't appear to increase malignancy risk in juvenile arthritis patients
    Sat, 12 Nov 2016 00:00:00 EST
    Tumor necrosis factor inhibitors, a group of biologic drugs used to treat children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis, are not associated with a significantly increased risk of cancer, according to new research findings presented this week at the American College of Rheumatology Annual Scientific Meeting in Washington.
  • Children need conventional CPR; black and Hispanic children more likely to get Hands-Only
    Sat, 12 Nov 2016 00:00:00 EST
    While compressions-only or Hands-Only CPR is as good as conventional CPR for adults, children benefit more from the conventional approach that includes rescue breaths. But black and Hispanic children are more likely to receive the compressions-only method, according to research presented at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2016.
  • CPR skills low among older adults
    Sat, 12 Nov 2016 00:00:00 EST
    CPR knowledge is low in many communities, especially among older adults. Separate studies a continent apart suggest older people are not trained in CPR and may be reluctant to start resuscitation efforts.Targeted educational initiatives could increase and improve CPR training.
  • Use of statins before cardiac arrest may aid survival afterwards
    Sat, 12 Nov 2016 00:00:00 EST
    Patients who have been using cholesterol-lowering drugs known as statins fare better after a cardiac arrest than non-users.Among subgroups of patients who use statins preventively, those with Type 2 diabetes see the greatest benefit after a cardiac arrest.
  • Frequent simulation-based training may improve CPR proficiency among hospital staff
    Sat, 12 Nov 2016 00:00:00 EST
    Mobile simulation training can improve CPR proficiency among hospital personnel.
  • Pest control: Wicked weeds may be agricultural angels
    Fri, 11 Nov 2016 00:00:00 EST
    Farmers looking to reduce reliance on pesticides, herbicides and other pest management tools may want to heed the advice of Cornell agricultural scientists: Let nature be nature -- to a degree.
  • Scientists develop tissue-engineered model of human lung and trachea
    Fri, 11 Nov 2016 00:00:00 EST
    Scientists at Children's Hospital Los Angeles have developed a tissue-engineered model of lung and trachea which contains the diverse cell types present in the human respiratory tract. The study, led by principal investigator Tracy Grikscheit, MD, a pediatric surgeon and scientist at The Saban Research Institute of CHLA, was published this week in the online version of the journal Tissue Engineering.
  • Surgery for back pain reduces problems with sex life-related pain
    Fri, 11 Nov 2016 00:00:00 EST
    For patients with degenerative spinal disease, surgery is more effective in reducing pain that interferes with sexual activity, compared to nonsurgical treatment, reports a study in the Nov. 15 issue of Spine, published by Wolters Kluwer.
  • Crowd workers help robot keep conversation fresh
    Fri, 11 Nov 2016 00:00:00 EST
    People can find a hundred ways to say the same thing, which poses a challenge to robots that are expected to keep up their end of conversations. A Disney Research team's solution is to devise an automated method of crowdsourcing multiple lines of dialogue. After all, 'hello' is a perfectly fine greeting, but not every time you see someone.
  • Immune cells may facilitate tumor growth by forming primitive vascular channels
    Fri, 11 Nov 2016 00:00:00 EST
    A new study led by scientists at The Scripps Research Institute suggests there may be a way to limit tumor growth by targeting immune system cells called macrophages.
  • Before a cure, a crusade to stop lung cancer from spreading
    Fri, 11 Nov 2016 00:00:00 EST
    Researchers from the University of Notre Dame are focused on better understanding lung cancer at a cellular level and investigating drugs that could inhibit lung cancer growth and prevent it from spreading.
  • Exclusive: Biotechnology leaders surveyed about impact of Trump presidency
    Fri, 11 Nov 2016 00:00:00 EST
    The day following the election of Donald J. Trump as President, a survey of leaders in biotechnology in the United States, conducted by Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News showed that Trump's presidency will negatively impact NIH research funding as well as STEM education; a plurality said it will also spark a 'brain drain' as foreign-born researchers educated in American universities will be more likely to leave.
  • Pneumonitis from ingesting fuel: Doctors treating refugees notice severe illness
    Fri, 11 Nov 2016 00:00:00 EST
    People fleeing across the Mediterranean by boat face many dangers. In a paper now published in the renowned medical journal Lancet, researchers working at the Technical University of Munich (TUM)'s Klinikum rechts der Isar, Städtisches Klinikum München GmbH, and Jamaica Hospital, New York, report for the first time on acute and sometimes fatal cases of pneumonitis resulting from the ingestion of fuel. The publication is intended to raise awareness of this illness among doctors treating refugees.
  • Keeping our balance -- a tale of two systems
    Fri, 11 Nov 2016 00:00:00 EST
    The transition from being sea creatures to living on land, even if it happened over 300 million years ago, seems to have left its traces on the way we keep our balance today.
  • UTA studies physical, mental states for focusing attention, exercising self-control
    Fri, 11 Nov 2016 00:00:00 EST
    Researchers at The University of Texas at Arlington are studying the ideal physical and mental states to help children and adults pay attention and practice self-control, by combining computer-game testing with a simultaneous ongoing analysis of heart-rate and skin activity.
  • Research finds new approach for quantifying nitrate discharge from groundwater to streams
    Fri, 11 Nov 2016 00:00:00 EST
    Researchers from North Carolina State University have developed a new way to determine the rate at which nitrate pollution will make its way from groundwater into streams.
  • Pneumonia rates linked to hospital ventilators have not dropped
    Fri, 11 Nov 2016 00:00:00 EST
    Contrary to data published by the Centers for Disease Control, ventilator-associated pneumonia rates in hospital intensive care units have not declined significantly since 2005, according to a new study out of the University of Connecticut School of Medicine.
  • New discovery paves way for pancreatic cancer treatment
    Fri, 11 Nov 2016 00:00:00 EST
    November is Pancreatic Cancer Awareness Month. With the discovery that most pancreatic cancer cases are resistant to chemotherapy, researchers at the University of Notre Dame are looking for better ways to treat patients.
  • Anesthesia changes neuronal choreography
    Fri, 11 Nov 2016 00:00:00 EST
    Even under deep anesthesia, nerve cells remain highly active. A study conducted by researchers from Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin has shown by high-resolution cellular imaging that local neuronal networks remain active even when the brain is unconscious. Under anesthesia, the nerve cells change their mode of operation by firing more synchronously, and by becoming surprisingly reactive to environmental stimuli. Results from this research have been published in the journal Frontiers in Cellular Neuroscience*.
  • Fun, comfort with exercise helps young people with conditions like autism and ADHD remain active
    Fri, 11 Nov 2016 00:00:00 EST
    The best way to help young people with neurodevelopmental disorders like autism and attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder get more exercise is to make it fun, according to a small international sampling of adults living with them.
  • New maps created by Stanford scientists reveal safe locations for wastewater injection
    Fri, 11 Nov 2016 00:00:00 EST
    New maps of the geologic forces contributing to earthquakes in Texas and Oklahoma could help reduce the likelihood of manmade temblors associated with wastewater injection.
  • Smartphone app for early autism detection being developed by UB undergrad
    Fri, 11 Nov 2016 00:00:00 EST
    Early detection of autism can dramatically improve the benefits of treatment, but often the disability is not suspected until a child enters school. A new smartphone app being developed by a University at Buffalo undergraduate and her advisor could change that by giving parents a reliable, easy-to-use tool for at home use to determine if there is a need for clinical examination.
  • Protozoan parasite increases risk of colitis, study reveals
    Fri, 11 Nov 2016 00:00:00 EST
    Researchers from the University of Toronto have discovered that mice infected with the common gut parasite Tritrichomonas muris are at an increased risk of developing inflammatory colitis. Their findings, which have been published online in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, expand the type of gut-resident microorganism that can affect the health of their host and suggest that related parasites may cause gastrointestinal disease in humans.
  • Plants modulate accumulation of metabolites at organ level
    Fri, 11 Nov 2016 00:00:00 EST
    Scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology and the University of Heidelberg, Germany, illuminated the diversity and different accumulation of chemical substances in plant tissues. Their approach, based on computational metabolomics and information theory, was specifically designed and enabled the researchers to study plant metabolism at organ level. This new method allows for a more efficient access to plant metabolites and for a more rapid identification of the genes which regulate their biosynthesis.
  • A new type of convection is proven in granular gases
    Fri, 11 Nov 2016 00:00:00 EST
    A new type of convection has been found that appears in a granular fluid and had hitherto not been detected in traditional fluids. The experimental development and results have been published in the magazine Physical Review Letters. This is a convection caused by perpendicular gradients, two vertical gradients -- gravity and the heat source at the base -- and a horizontal gradient, comprised by the difference in energy derived from the inelastic collisions against the lateral wall.
  • Even physicists are 'afraid' of mathematics
    Fri, 11 Nov 2016 00:00:00 EST
    Physicists avoid highly mathematical work despite being trained in advanced mathematics, new research suggests.
  • Using pectin to advance neuron-like electronic systems
    Fri, 11 Nov 2016 00:00:00 EST
    A team of Italian scientists have built on previous work in this field using pectin with a high degree of methylation as the medium to create a new architecture of hybrid device with a double-layered polyelectrolyte that alone drives memristive behavior. They discuss their work in this week's AIP Advances.
  • Antibody drug conjugates have shown clinical efficacy with acceptable toxicity
    Fri, 11 Nov 2016 00:00:00 EST
    Antibody drug conjugates have shown a clearly documented efficacy and acceptable toxicity and can be easily implemented in oncology departments where chemotherapy administration is a routine practice. A similar efficacy with acceptable toxicity has been documented with antibody radionuclide conjugates which need to be injected with the help of a nuclear medicine department which can be a limitation for referral from an oncologist.
  • New findings about the honey bee infecting deformed wing virus
    Fri, 11 Nov 2016 00:00:00 EST
    Researchers from the University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna have succeeded for the first time in simulating the course of disease using artificial genetic material of the deformed wing virus. The symptoms of the so-called mite disease were reproduced in the laboratory without mites by the injection of synthetic RNA. This enabled the prudent development of new strategies in order to protect the bee population in the future. The results were published in the journal PLOS ONE.
  • Children with feeding tubes benefit most from multidisciplinary care
    Fri, 11 Nov 2016 00:00:00 EST
    A new study finds positive outcomes associated with intensive multidisciplinary treatment for children with pediatric feeding disorder who may require a feeding tube to support growth and development.
  • The effect of exercise on vascular function and stiffness in type 2 diabetes
    Fri, 11 Nov 2016 00:00:00 EST
    A new study from the University of Sydney has found that regular aerobic exercise can improve artery health in people with type 2 diabetes. The findings from this study have been published in Current Diabetes Reviews, and shed new light on exercise as a therapy in this population.
  • Magnetic Resonance Imaging to predict the salt content of Iberian ham
    Fri, 11 Nov 2016 00:00:00 EST
    The University of Extremadura have developed a non-destructive, innocuous method using magnetic resonance, computer vision and statistical calculus that enables one to quantify the salt content of Iberian ham, and classify it according to the degree of penetration of the salt in the muscle.
  • Victims of childhood bullying more likely to be overweight as young adults
    Fri, 11 Nov 2016 00:00:00 EST
    Children who are bullied in primary and secondary school are nearly twice as likely to be overweight at the age of 18 than non-bullied children, according to a new study by researchers from King's College London.
  • Study examines effectiveness of probation program
    Fri, 11 Nov 2016 00:00:00 EST
    Within the criminal justice community, an approach to community supervision known as Honest Opportunity Probation with Enforcement (HOPE) has generated widespread enthusiasm and praise as a way to reduce substance use, violations, new arrests, and revocations to prison, while also leading to significant cost savings for local justice systems. A new study casts doubts on the benefits of HOPE over probation as usual, however.
  • Primitive reward-driven behaviors may bias the information people choose to sample
    Fri, 11 Nov 2016 00:00:00 EST
    The way people make decisions often seems irrational. New research in open-access journal PLOS Biology suggests that the tendency to choose items associated with rewards -- known as 'Pavlovian approach' -- can bias the information people choose to seek, according to Laurence Hunt from University College London, UK, and his colleagues.
  • Genomic tools to combat the spread of the invasive Asian longhorned beetle
    Fri, 11 Nov 2016 00:00:00 EST
    The Asian longhorned beetle, Anoplophora glabripennis, also known as the starry sky beetle, is native to eastern Asia but has successfully invaded North America and Europe where it infests maple, birch, willow, elm, and poplar trees. Published in the journal Genome Biology, an international team of scientists report on the sequencing, annotation, and comparative exploration of this beetle's genome in an effort to develop novel tools to combat its spread and better understand the biology of invasive wood-boring pests.
  • Skin bacteria could protect against disease
    Fri, 11 Nov 2016 00:00:00 EST
    There are more and more examples of the ways in which we can benefit from our bacteria. According to researcher Rolf Lood from Lund University in Sweden, this is true for the skin as well. He has shown that the most common bacteria on human skin secrete a protein which protects us from the reactive oxygen species thought to contribute to several skin diseases. The protein has an equally strong effect on dangerous oxygen species as known antioxidants such as vitamin C and vitamin E.
  • Development of a wearable medical device for type 2 diabetes
    Fri, 11 Nov 2016 00:00:00 EST
    Although effective for the treatment of diabetes, exercise is sometimes difficult for overweight or elderly people. A new wearable medical device developed by Kumamoto University has been found to effect visceral fat loss and improve blood glucose (sugar). The current study reports clinical trial results for optimal use frequency.
  • What does it take to make a memory? Study says new proteins
    Fri, 11 Nov 2016 00:00:00 EST
    Scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have for the first time identified a sub-region in the brain that works to form a particular kind of memory: fear-associated with a specific environmental cue or "contextual fear memory."
  • Pesticide exposures can cause changes in oral microbiome
    Fri, 11 Nov 2016 00:00:00 EST
    Pesticide exposure in farmworkers from agricultural communities is associated with changes in the oral microbiome. This is the first study to demonstrate such a correlation in humans. The research is published Nov. 11 in Applied and Environmental Microbiology, a journal of the American Society for Microbiology.
  • Skipping breakfast and not enough sleep can make children overweight
    Fri, 11 Nov 2016 00:00:00 EST
    Mothers smoking in pregnancy, children skipping breakfast and not having a regular bedtime or sufficient sleep all appear to be important factors in predicting whether a child will become overweight or obese.
  • Ventilator-associated pneumonia rates remain stable, substantial
    Fri, 11 Nov 2016 00:00:00 EST
    In a study published online by JAMA, Mark L. Metersky, M.D., of the UConn School of Medicine, Farmington, and colleagues analyzed trends in Medicare Patient Safety Monitoring System ventilator-associated pneumonia rates from 2005 through 2013.
  • Pain sensors specialized for specific sensations
    Fri, 11 Nov 2016 00:00:00 EST
    Many pain-sensing nerves in the body are thought to respond to all types of 'painful events', but new UCL research in mice reveals that in fact most are specialized to respond to specific types such as heat, cold or mechanical pain.The study found that over 85 percent of pain-sensing neurons in whole organisms are sensitive to one specific type of painful stimulus.
  • Meteorites reveal lasting drought on Mars
    Fri, 11 Nov 2016 00:00:00 EST
    The lack of liquid water on the surface of Mars today has been demonstrated by new evidence in the form of meteorites on the Red Planet examined by an international team of planetary scientists led by the University of Stirling.
  • New findings show promise for treatment of Graves' disease and other ocular disorders
    Fri, 11 Nov 2016 00:00:00 EST
    A new class of therapies may be on the horizon for thyroid eye disease (TED) and other destructive scarring conditions. A new study published in The American Journal of Pathology found that activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor pathway by its ligands blocks collagen production and myofibroblast proliferation in TED.
  • Traumatic stress changes brains of boys, girls differently, Stanford study finds
    Fri, 11 Nov 2016 00:00:00 EST
    Traumatic stress affects the brains of adolescent boys and girls differently, according to a new brain-scanning study from the Stanford University School of Medicine.
  • Odds of having asthma 53 percent higher in food deserts
    Fri, 11 Nov 2016 00:00:00 EST
    A new study shows living in a food desert means you're at increased risk to have asthma. Children who were studied who did not have access to fresh fruits and vegetables had higher rates of asthma than children who did have access.
  • Teens with asthma almost twice as likely to smoke as their healthy counterparts
    Fri, 11 Nov 2016 00:00:00 EST
    A study presented at the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology Annual Scientific Meeting found adolescents with asthma were twice as likely to smoke as kids without asthma. And they continue to smoke well into their teen years, even though they know smoking is particularly bad for their lungs.
  • Many doctors still don't know facts about penicillin allergy
    Fri, 11 Nov 2016 00:00:00 EST
    Many physicians whose patients have 'penicillin allergy' in their charts don't know that a penicillin allergy diagnosis is frequently given to a child as the result of a rash, but without any follow up testing.
  • School staff know more than they think they do about treating anaphylaxis
    Fri, 11 Nov 2016 00:00:00 EST
    A study being presented at the ACAAI Annual Scientific Meeting found only 18 percent of non-nurse school staff surveyed felt very confident in their ability to recognize anaphylaxis symptoms, but many actually knew what to do.
  • When and how to introduce peanut-containing foods to reduce allergy risk
    Fri, 11 Nov 2016 00:00:00 EST
    Presentations at the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology Annual Scientific Meeting will offer guidance, based on soon to be released guidelines, on how to introduce peanut-containing foods to infants.
  • College students with food allergies find big challenges in staying safe
    Fri, 11 Nov 2016 00:00:00 EST
    A study being presented at the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology Annual Scientific Meeting found most colleges don't have integrated systems in place to support food-allergic students.
  • Access to asthma meds, plus flu vaccines, keep kids with asthma healthy
    Fri, 11 Nov 2016 00:00:00 EST
    Kids need flu shots to prevent asthma flares, and medications available in school to keep 86 percent in class, according to two studies being presented at the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology Annual Scientific Meeting.
  • Arthritis drug boosts effectiveness of antidepressant medication, Loyola study finds
    Thu, 10 Nov 2016 00:00:00 EST
    Giving severely depressed patients the arthritis drug celecoxib (Celebrex®) dramatically boosted the effectiveness of their antidepressant medication, a Loyola study has found.
  • Cosmic whistle packs a surprisingly energetic punch
    Thu, 10 Nov 2016 00:00:00 EST
    For the first time, astronomers have discovered that mysterious 'cosmic whistles' known as fast radio bursts have a billion times more explosive power than previously known. The team is the first to detect gamma rays -- the most powerful type of electromagnetic energy -- in these fast radio bursts, which previously had been detected exclusively in radio waves -- the least powerful type of electromagnetic energy
  • Molecular structure in Zika virus leads to potentially disease-causing RNAs
    Thu, 10 Nov 2016 00:00:00 EST
    Researchers, led by scientists at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, have found basic molecular processes used by the Zika virus to 'hijack' the cells that it infects and potentially how it makes molecules that are directly linked to disease.
  • Breakthrough in the quantum transfer of information between matter and light
    Thu, 10 Nov 2016 00:00:00 EST
    From stationary to flying qubits at speeds never reached before...This feat, achieved by a team from Polytechnique Montréal and France's Centre national de la recherche scientifique, brings us a little closer to the era when information is transmitted via quantum principles.
  • Ready for launch: CU Boulder instrument suite to assess space weather
    Thu, 10 Nov 2016 00:00:00 EST
    A multimillion dollar University of Colorado Boulder instrument package expected to help scientists better understand potentially damaging space weather is now slated to launch aboard a National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration satellite on Saturday, Nov. 19.
  • Nature already dramatically impacted by climate change, study reveals
    Thu, 10 Nov 2016 00:00:00 EST
    Global climate change has already impacted every aspect of life on Earth, from genes to entire ecosystems, according to a new University of Florida study.
  • Scientists come up with light-driven motors to power nanorobots of the future
    Thu, 10 Nov 2016 00:00:00 EST
    Scientists from MIPT and partner institutes have proposed a model nanosized dipole photomotor based on the phenomenon of light-induced charge redistribution. Triggered by a laser pulse, this tiny device is capable of directed motion and is much faster than similar models based on organic molecules or motor proteins. The motor could be applied wherever rapid nanoparticle transport is required: in new analytical and synthetic instruments, drug delivery systems, improved gene therapy strategies, etc.
  • Stanford solar physicist finds new way to study the inner workings of the sun
    Thu, 10 Nov 2016 00:00:00 EST
    Neutrinos from the sun carry information about its fiery core but they are extremely hard to detect. Now, Stanford researchers may have found a much easier and less expensive way to study these elusive particles.
  • UCR researchers discover new method to dissipate heat in electronic devices
    Thu, 10 Nov 2016 00:00:00 EST
    For the first time, an international team of scientists led by a researcher at the University of California, Riverside has modified the energy spectrum of acoustic phonons-- elemental excitations, also referred to as quasi-particles, that spread heat through crystalline materials like a wave--by confining them to nanometer-scale semiconductor structures. The results have important implications in the thermal management of electronic devices.
  • Getting doctors and nurses to work together at patient bedsides
    Thu, 10 Nov 2016 00:00:00 EST
    The structure of health care systems helps determine how doctors and nurses collaborate during hospital rounds, according to Penn State College of Medicine researchers. A greater understanding of such team-based treatment in hospitals could help improve patient care.
  • Australian continent shifts with the seasons, study finds
    Thu, 10 Nov 2016 00:00:00 EST
    Australia shifts and tilts back and forth by several millimeters each year because of changes to the Earth's center of mass, according to a new study. The findings could help scientists better track the precise location of Earth's center of mass, which is important for GPS and other satellite measurements, according to the study's author.
  • NASA sees heavy rain in Tropical Depression Ma-on
    Thu, 10 Nov 2016 00:00:00 EST
    Tropical Depression Ma-on formed on Nov. 10, 2016, northeast of Guam. Ma-on had maximum sustained winds estimated at 30 knots (34.5 mph) when the Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core observatory satellite flew over.
  • Mirroring a drop in emissions, mercury in tuna also declines
    Thu, 10 Nov 2016 00:00:00 EST
    For years, public health experts have warned against eating certain kinds of fish, including tuna, that tend to accumulate mercury. Still, tuna consumption provides more mercury to US consumers than any other source. But recently, as industry cuts down on its mercury emissions, research has found mercury concentrations in some fish are dropping. The latest study, published in Environmental Science & Technology, reports that this is the case for prized Atlantic bluefin tuna.
  • RIT professor images David Livingstone diaries, gives talks in UK
    Thu, 10 Nov 2016 00:00:00 EST
    Multispectral imaging technology continues to recover new insights from the field diaries of 19th-century explorer David Livingstone. A team of scholars and scientists who worked on the Livingstone Spectral Imaging project, including Roger Easton, professor in the Chester F. Carlson Center for Imaging Science at Rochester Institute of Technology, will present their research in public talks in the United Kingdom in November.
  • $384,961.42 for a house? When precise bids work and when they backfire
    Thu, 10 Nov 2016 00:00:00 EST
    Making a very precise offer for a car or a house may hurt your chances of success if you're negotiating with someone who has expertise in that area, according to research published in Psychological Science. A series of studies shows that precise bids are more effective with novice negotiators, who tend to interpret higher precision as a sign of competence. Experts, on the other hand, found moderately precise bids to be most persuasive.
  • Predators can drive increase in virus populations, new study shows
    Thu, 10 Nov 2016 00:00:00 EST
    In what scientists say could be a potential 'game-changer' in the study of virology, a new study shows that a predator's consumption of prey can catalyze the natural rise and fall of chlorovirus populations.
  • Repeatedly thinking about work-family conflict linked to health problems
    Thu, 10 Nov 2016 00:00:00 EST
    Thinking over and over again about conflicts between your job and personal life is likely to damage both your mental and physical health.
  • 'Exceptional' nanosensor architecture based on exceptional points
    Thu, 10 Nov 2016 00:00:00 EST
    Researchers from the University of California San Diego have developed a novel design for a compact, ultra-sensitive nanosensor that can be used to make portable health-monitoring devices and to detect minute quantities of toxins and explosives for security applications. The nanosensor design combines three-dimensional plasmonic nanoparticles with singularities called exceptional points -- a combination that's being demonstrated for the first time.
  • UM researchers document ancient and methane-derived carbon in stoneflies
    Thu, 10 Nov 2016 00:00:00 EST
    New research by scientists at the University of Montana's Flathead Lake Biological Station has documented the first example of freshwater consumers using ancient methane-derived carbon and the most extensive example of a methane-derived carbon contribution to a river ecosystem.
  • Smartphones offer promise in better gauging rural life, researchers find
    Thu, 10 Nov 2016 00:00:00 EST
    The use of smartphones enhances self-reporting of weather incidents, school attendance, illness, and other aspects of daily life in rural areas, a team of researchers has found. Its pilot study indicates that such technologies have the potential to transform data collection in these regions, providing near-real-time windows into the development of markets, the spread of diseases, and the diffusion of ideas and innovations.
  • How ACOs are trying to improve patients' health by addressing nonmedical needs
    Thu, 10 Nov 2016 00:00:00 EST
    In a first-of-its-kind study, researchers from The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice and the School of Public Health at UC Berkeley investigated whether new value-based payment models have spurred providers to address patients' nonmedical needs, such as housing, transportation and food insecurity.
  • The kids are alright: Youth are civically engaged, despite income inequality
    Thu, 10 Nov 2016 00:00:00 EST
    Income inequality is linked with greater civic engagement among youth, particularly among youth of color and those of lower socioeconomic status, finds a study by NYU Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development.
  • New eye pressure test could prevent vision loss in older adults
    Thu, 10 Nov 2016 00:00:00 EST
    By age 75, approximately half of all Americans will develop cloudy vision caused by cataracts, according to the National Eye Institute. The most common complication from cataract surgery is high eye pressure, which can cause swelling and other issues that can lead to vision loss or even blindness. Now, researchers from the University of Missouri School of Medicine recommend a new test to check eye pressure to prevent possible vision loss.
  • Copyright 2016 American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS); All rights reserved.