NOVA scienceNOW | PBS
13 Nov 2016

NOVA scienceNOW

  • Five Reasons to Eat Insects
    Wed, 13 Jun 2012 16:00:00 EST
    Save room for bugs! They're the future of green cuisine.
  • Profile: Shaundra Daily
    Wed, 02 Mar 2011 9:00:00 EST
    This software engineer and dancer found her groove teaching children about their emotional lives.
  • What's the Next Big Thing?: Watch the Program
    Thu, 24 Feb 2011 9:00:00 EST
    Watch the program online on NOVA now
  • Cars That Power the Grid
    Thu, 17 Feb 2011 17:00:00 EST
    Electric cars that feed energy back to the power grid may play a critical role in a future "smart grid."
  • Where Did We Come From?: Watch the Program
    Thu, 17 Feb 2011 9:00:00 EST
    Watch the program online on NOVA now
  • How Smart Are Animals?: Watch the Program
    Thu, 10 Feb 2011 9:00:00 EST
    Watch the program online on NOVA now
  • Dolphin Reading Test
    Wed, 09 Feb 2011 17:00:00 EST
    Watch as a dolphin's reading ability is put to the test.
  • How Does the Brain Work?: Watch the Program
    Thu, 03 Feb 2011 9:00:00 EST
    Watch the program online on NOVA now
  • Change Blindness
    Thu, 27 Jan 2011 17:00:00 EST
    How can we miss big visual changes that happen right before our eyes?
  • Can We Live Forever?: Watch the Program
    Thu, 27 Jan 2011 9:00:00 EST
    Watch the program online on NOVA now
  • Profile: Steffie Tomson
    Wed, 02 Feb 2011 9:00:00 EST
    Neuroscientist Steffie Tomson doesn't just study the bizarre phenomena of synesthesia, she's a synesthete herself.
  • Can We Make It to Mars?: Watch the Program
    Thu, 20 Jan 2011 9:00:00 EST
    Watch the program online on NOVA now
  • NOVA scienceNOW: Phoenix Mars Lander
    Mon, 28 Jul 2008 13:00:00 EST
    NASA's latest robot has already found frozen water and is looking for more signs that the Red Planet could support life.
  • NOVA scienceNOW: Brain Trauma
    Mon, 28 Jul 2008 13:00:00 EST
    Even so-called "mild" head injuries turn out to be anything but.
  • NOVA scienceNOW: Mammoth Mystery
    Mon, 28 Jul 2008 13:00:00 EST
    A pair of mammoth skeletons is found locked together by their tusks. What happened?
  • NOVA scienceNOW: Profile: Judah Folkman
    Mon, 28 Jul 2008 13:00:00 EST
    Once scorned for his ideas about how cancer grows, the late Judah Folkman is now hailed as a visionary.
  • NOVA scienceNOW: Dispatch: Asking Big Questions
    Mon, 28 Jul 2008 13:00:00 EST
    In this excerpt from a 2002 commencement address at Oberlin College, the late cancer researcher Judah Folkman describes how he learned to think outside the box when he was in high school. Listen in.
  • NOVA scienceNOW: Leeches
    Mon, 21 Jul 2008 13:00:00 EST
    A century after falling out of favor among doctors, medicinal leeches are back in hospitals, sucking away on patients' wounds.
  • NOVA scienceNOW: The Search for ET
    Mon, 21 Jul 2008 13:00:00 EST
    Astronomers have their radio telescopes tuned to receive signals from alien worlds. But is anybody out there?
  • NOVA scienceNOW: Stem Cells Breakthrough
    Mon, 21 Jul 2008 13:00:00 EST
    Three separate teams overcome a biomedical hurdle -- creating stem cells without the use of human embryos.
  • NOVA scienceNOW: Profile: Edith Widder
    Mon, 21 Jul 2008 13:00:00 EST
    Meet a marine biologist and explorer who has engineered new ways to spy on deep-sea creatures.
  • NOVA scienceNOW: Bird Brains
    Fri, 11 Jul 2008 12:00:00 EST
    Clues to the origins of human language are turning up in the brains of birds.
  • NOVA scienceNOW: Space Storms
    Fri, 11 Jul 2008 12:00:00 EST
    Behind the dazzling display of the aurora borealis are space storms that could turn the lights off here on Earth.
  • NOVA scienceNOW: Profile: Yoky Matsuoka
    Fri, 11 Jul 2008 12:00:00 EST
    A former tennis prodigy aims to create advanced prosthetic limbs controlled by human thought.
  • NOVA scienceNOW: Smart Bridges
    Fri, 11 Jul 2008 12:00:00 EST
    Can we engineer bridges that tell us what's wrong with them before it's too late?
  • NOVA scienceNOW: Dispatch: Bridge Doctors
    Thu, 10 Jul 2008 16:00:00 EST
    In this audio feature, engineer Michael Todd explains how new sensing technologies may help detect structural problems within bridges before they become dangerous.
  • NOVA scienceNOW: Saving Hubble
    Thu, 03 Jul 2008 12:00:00 EST
    Two teams of spacewalkers take on the risky mission of reviving the ailing Space Telescope.
  • NOVA scienceNOW: First Primates
    Thu, 03 Jul 2008 12:00:00 EST
    Our most distant primate ancestors, which took the stage shortly after the dinosaurs left it, were tree-dwellers the size of mice.
  • NOVA scienceNOW: Profile: Alfredo Quinones-Hinojosa
    Thu, 03 Jul 2008 12:00:00 EST
    He jumped the fence from Mexico to work as a farmhand and ended up a leading brain surgeon.
  • NOVA scienceNOW: Killer Microbe
    Thu, 03 Jul 2008 12:00:00 EST
    A relatively benign bug becomes a highly lethal pathogen, known to U.S. soldiers as Iraqibacter.
  • NOVA scienceNOW: Dispatch: Personal Genome Project
    Fri, 27 Jun 2008 19:00:00 EST
    In this video dispatch, learn why George Church of Harvard Medical School hopes to recruit 100,000 people and sequence all of their DNA.
  • NOVA scienceNOW: Dispatch: Falling Through the Earth
    Tue, 24 Jun 2008 11:00:00 EST
    Join host Neil deGrasse Tyson for a fantastic voyage through Earth's molten core -- without getting burned.
  • NOVA scienceNOW: Personal DNA Testing
    Mon, 23 Jun 2008 11:00:00 EST
    Genetic testing to assess risk factors for a handful of serious illnesses is now commercially available. But is it a good idea?
  • NOVA scienceNOW: Art Authentication
    Mon, 23 Jun 2008 11:00:00 EST
    See how clever computer algorithms can distinguish a master fake from a masterpiece.
  • NOVA scienceNOW: Capturing Carbon
    Mon, 23 Jun 2008 11:00:00 EST
    An eighth-grader's science fair project prompts her scientist father to develop a new way to pull excess carbon dioxide out of the atmosphere.
  • NOVA scienceNOW: Profile: Pardis Sabeti
    Mon, 23 Jun 2008 11:00:00 EST
    By night she's a rocker. By day, she's a Harvard geneticist tracking the evolution of the human genome.
  • NOVA scienceNOW: Dispatch: Hands on Hubble
    Fri, 06 Jun 2008 09:00:00 EST
    John Grunsfeld, an astronomer and astronaut, says that fixing the Hubble Space Telescope will be a delicate operation. Here, he explains how astronauts will have to literally let their fingers do the walking when working on the satellite -- and why the gloves of their space suits will play a major role in the mission's success.
  • NOVA scienceNOW: Dark Matter
    Wed, 04 Jun 2008 16:00:00 EST
    Turns out most of the universe is held together by a mysterious, invisible substance.
  • NOVA scienceNOW: Of Mice and Memory
    Wed, 04 Jun 2008 16:00:00 EST
    Mice placed in enriched environments can recover lost memories, giving hope to those who study Alzheimer's.
  • NOVA scienceNOW: Profile: Hany Farid
    Wed, 04 Jun 2008 16:00:00 EST
    This self-proclaimed "accidental scientist" is a digital detective inventing new ways to tell if photos have been faked.
  • NOVA scienceNOW: Wisdom of the Crowds
    Wed, 04 Jun 2008 16:00:00 EST
    Ask enough people to estimate something, and their combined guesses will get you surprisingly close to the right answer.
  • NOVA scienceNOW: Dispatch: Asking Big Questions
    Thu, 22 May 2008 11:00:00 EST
    In this excerpt from a 2002 commencement address at Oberlin College, the late cancer researcher Judah Folkman describes how he learned to think outside the box when he was in high school.
  • NOVA scienceNOW: Dispatch: Finding Lost Memories
    Thu, 24 Apr 2008 15:00:00 EST
    In diseases like Alzheimer's, are forgotten memories gone for good? MIT's Eric Lander and Li-Huei Tsai discuss new experiments that are exploring whether these "lost" memories can be regained.
  • NOVA scienceNOW: Dispatch: Finding a Fake Van Gogh
    Thu, 10 Apr 2008 16:00:00 EST
    Can a computer tell the difference between an original van Gogh painting and a fake? NOVA scienceNOW producer Dean Irwin describes how 21st-century technology can help museum curators catch even the most skilled forgers.
  • NOVA scienceNOW: Dispatch: Eavesdropping on E.T.
    Wed, 05 Mar 2008 17:00:00 EST
    Seth Shostak, senior astronomer at SETI, thinks it's just a matter of time before we find evidence of other intelligent life in the universe.
  • NOVA scienceNOW: Dispatch: Global Meltdown
    Thu, 21 Feb 2008 14:00:00 EST
    Glaciologist Lonnie Thompson says that glaciers around the world are disappearing -- fast.
  • NOVA scienceNOW: Dispatch: Doctor Q
    Thu, 07 Feb 2008 12:00:00 EST
    Neurosurgeon Alfredo Quinones-Hinojosa's career didn't start in a hospital -- it began in a farm field. Listen in. And watch for Dr. Q's profile on NOVA scienceNOW this summer.
  • NOVA scienceNOW: Dispatch: Leeches!
    Wed, 21 Nov 2007 12:00:00 EST
    Mark Siddall, a leech expert at the American Museum of Natural History, wants to change how you think about nature's most notorious blood-suckers. Listen in.
  • NOVA scienceNOW: Dispatch: A Cosmic Enigma
    Wed, 22 Aug 2007 15:00:00 EST
    Dark matter is a cosmic enigma. We can't see it or touch it—so what is it? We asked MIT physicist Max Tegmark about the nature of this strange substance and why it remains so mysterious.
  • NOVA scienceNOW: Ask The Expert: Epigenetics
    Thu, 02 Aug 2007 14:00:00 EST
    Randy Jirtle answered viewer questions about epigenetics on August 2, 2007.
  • NOVA scienceNOW: Ask The Expert: T. Rex Blood?
    Tue, 31 Jul 2007 11:00:00 EST
    On July 31, 2007, Mary Schweitzer answered selected viewer questions about her discovery of what may be blood vessels and red blood cells, the implications of that and similar discoveries, and other matters dinosaurian and paleontological.
  • NOVA scienceNOW: Ask The Expert: Kronos
    Mon, 30 Jul 2007 13:00:00 EST
    On July 30, 2007, Jim Sanborn answered selected viewer questions about his sculpture Kryptos, including ones about the unsolved fourth part.
  • NOVA scienceNOW: Ask The Expert: Arlie Petters
    Mon, 30 Jul 2007 13:00:00 EST
    On July 30, 2007, Arlie Petters answered selected viewer questions about his life and work.
  • Copyright 2008-2012 NOVA/WGBH Educational Foundation